Tag Archives: students

Zau Haskins: Dance Club

Zau Haskins

by Zau Haskins ’21 

One of the most important things that George School offers for students is for them to take their own initiative to get involved with the community. One of the ways GS provides students to take their own initiative is by giving the opportunity for student run clubs. The clubs at GS are made and ran by students which gives us an outlet to express to the community our ideas, hobbies, concerns, and any other reason that would spark someone’s interest to make a club. This year, along with 2 other students, created and organized our own dance club. We combined our love for different styles of dance like, contemporary, hip-hop, modern, and others to teach to anyone of any skill level to just come and have fun. I enjoy dance club every week, because I am doing what I love and sharing it with my peers for overall a good time to let off some of the stress during the week!

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Weekends at George School

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by Zau Haskins ’21

One of the most fun ways to end a week and take your mind off stress from school is during a GS weekend. Each weekend on campus is planned with a theme and includes many activities and fun trips to go on. There is never a bland time on campus because there is always something you could do! Some of the weekends on campus include Upper and Lower Dorm Weekends which encompass bar-b-ques, a great selection of movies to see with friends, ice cream socials with the members of your dorm and other dorms to get to know new people, mall trips, and even late-night food trips! My favorite weekend at GS is Harvest Weekend. This usually takes place during the fall time where it is cold outside so some of the activities include hot chocolate in Marshall, haunted Hayrides with friends around campus, s’more roasting, pumpkin carving, and apple butter making just to name a few. My favorite part about this weekend is seeing not only GS students coming out to the different events, but also seeing faculty families and other local families coming together and having a great time. This was very exciting to me witnessing how friendly and welcoming the GS community is to everyone which is the foundation of a Quaker Community!

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The Importance of an Advisor

Collection

Sarah with her Advisor and collection group

by Sarah Mayer ’21

When I started freshmen year George School I was a little nervous regarding the amount of time and effort that would be required to meet the rigorous academic requirements. Since then I have grown to appreciate the academics and emotional support that is provided. George School really focuses on our mental health since they realize the amount of work that is given plus the additional stresses of extracurricular activities puts a lot of pressure on us. When you join the community you will be randomly assigned an advisor. An advisor is a faculty member who meets with you along with 3-6 other students 3 times a week. The advisor is someone who you can go to for any reason and is there to ensure you are successful. Another academic support GS provides are consultations, which are when you meet with a teacher for guidance academically. For example, you need to go over some material or any other issue that would need to be consulted there is time allotted at the end of the day to do so. Another option is, each night during study hall there is writing, language, math, and other services to help you with whatever you may be having trouble with. Overall GS provides a very helpful support system.

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Meet Andrew, Class of 2019

Andrew Arth

by Andrew Arth ’19 

Hello Friends, to begin I would like to introduce myself.  I am Andrew Arth, a senior day student, IB Diploma candidate and two sport varsity athlete.  I will be taking you through my first term of my senior year at GS, but first you should get to know me a little better.  The story starts with my brother, who graduated in 2014 and showed me what George School was, what it is, and what it could be.  I fell in love with it at first sight, infatuated and drawn in by the sprawl of South Lawn, the history of the brick, and the energy of the students.  Fast forward, almost eight years and here I am.  I am a co-founder and leader of a club, 2 year member of the Discipline Committee, a 3x varsity captain, a writing center mentor, and perhaps most importantly writing this blog to you, the reader, right now.  This is my most important task to date because I want to share what George School means to me and what it could possibly mean to you.  There will be ups and downs, highs and lows, victories and losses, but most importantly there will be one constant: George School.  It is the glue which holds our very community together. Let me share it with you.  Signing out for now.

 

-Andrew

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Meet Sarah, Class of 2021

Sarah Mayer '21

Each term, George School Ambassadors will write blogs detailing the George School experience through their eyes. We hope you enjoy meeting Sarah ’21 and following her George School journey.

Hello Everyone,

My name is Sarah Mayer and I’m a sophomore day student. Over the last two years, I have grown to love this community both academically and socially. A few of my passions are musical theater, science (specifically medicine), and hanging out with my friends. The friendships I have made are sure to last a lifetime. Another aspect of George school that I like is the diversity. I have met students from around the world including France, China, and India. Initially, I was introduced to the Friends or Quaker Community when I attended Buckingham Friends School. Each week for the last ten years I have been attending Quaker Meeting for Worship. Meeting For Worship is held once or twice a week when the whole community will sit in a shared silence to reflect on one’s thoughts, and if they feel moved to speak they can share these thoughts. Another reason I have really enjoyed attending a Quaker school is the thoughtful community where the teachers ensure an academically friendly community. I said yes to GS because of the friendly academic community where everyone can prosper in their own way whether it be academically, athletically, artistically, or whatever path you choose.

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Focused Studying

by Ryan Tufford ’20

At George School, most new students think that the amount of school work is overwhelming. Coming here last year, I had the same worry. I thought it would be hard to adjust from my middle school workload to a rigorous high school workload. To my surprise it was not that difficult to adjust. It took me a bit of time to balance my school work with things outside of school like sports and even enjoying a social life seemed like a challenge at first. I learned that there are ways here to become better at time management, some that are mandatory at George School, and some that I had to personally work towards.

As a boarder, I have a required study hall period from 7:30-9:30 p.m. Monday through Thursday and on Sunday nights. This may seem like a hassle for new students, but it is hard to put into words how beneficial those two hours a night can be. It is a time where I am required to focus on work, and I would not be as productive without study hall.

Some nights I am unable to complete all my work in the two hours, so I have to adjust my schedule and this may mean less socializing during or after dinner. Nonetheless, the ways I have changed to obtain a better schedule here have had a great positive influence on me. I know I definitely had to make changes to balance out school work and activities after school, but those changes were not that hard to make.

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Culture Shock, Vietnam and Plastic Bottles: Lessons Learned (thus far) at GS

226-William Street

by Will Street ’18

When I was first driving through what I would later call Newtown, my first thought was, “Wow, this place is super white.” Now, I would ask that you excuse me for that, as I come from a city that is quite literally the blackest municipality in the country with an 82% African-American or Black population. I also ask that you remain conscious that I had always been around people who looked differently than me, but an entire city? Never that.

When I hit George School’s campus, though, I released a long, loud sigh of relief when I saw a group of people of color walking across campus, and a smile went across my face when I saw that the group was not monolithic. There was an Asian student, a black student, a white student, and a Hispanic student all laughing and enjoying each other’s company. What I did not know that day is that, that friend group would mirror mine in the coming years. I would make an Asian friend who lives in the bustling city of Seoul, I would make friends who look like me but their origins span from the Bronx to Somalia and I would make white friends from small, rural towns in New Jersey and Pennsylvania. This is proof that George School is not just a melting pot, but it is a massive cauldron of cultures, races, and identities. All that said, there were still growing pains in me reaching this conclusion.

Walking into my room on August 31, 2014 would be the event that would change my perspective on culture and would challenge my patience and my desire to keep an open mind. I stopped in front of the door, and the name read “Truong Son Nguyen Viet” and I felt my face scrunch up and my parents prodded me to open the door. They were seemingly as nervous and unsure as I was. I opened the door and I saw a tall, lanky, large headed (Son, forgive me for that) figure standing and putting away his clothes. He turned around  and there was a brief pause. He broke the silence by saying, “Hi, my name is Son” and held out his hand for me to shake. Admittedly, he was harder to understand, but we’ll address that later.

The first couple of months were bad. We argued about the room being cleaned (I was the dirty one), my volume of showers a day and how loud my friends were when they came inside of the room. A couple of years later, he would later admit that he wanted to make a roommate switch, but luckily he didn’t. After our rough patch, we made a deal that if I taught him to speak English more proficiently, he would teach me Vietnamese curse words. As a freshman, this was a sweet quid pro quo. There were many nights where we would talk and whenever he mispronounced a word, I would kindly tell him the correct pronunciation. In return, he would spend 10 minutes helping me properly pronounce how to tell someone off in his language. We would have extensive conversations, albeit at times uncomfortable, about foreign policy namely the Vietnamese war and how the way we’re taught about it differs. These conversations changed how I viewed the world and encouraged me to be a more understanding, open minded global citizen and he admitted that I changed his perspective on race and how he viewed people of color. We remained roommates up until our senior year, and it was not by choice that we were separated. We were given prefect in different dorms.

Now, at this point you may be wondering what plastic bottles has to do with one of my important lessons. 9th grade, I had been elected to student council as a class representative, and my motives were not pure. In fact, I had this Machiavellian-esque plan to take over the council that ultimately failed, so I would go on to fight every battle that came before us as a council and was debateable. There was one moment that would teach me a lesson that would be important to my development as a GS man. One day, a proposal came before us to discuss the use of plastic water bottles. I thought to myself: “this is my chance!” I tirelessly researched plastic bottle usage and how it would hurt the American worker. I said my points before the meeting, and people looked at me confused and some were chuckling. Later that year, Tom Hoopes would give me the wisdom I needed all along and that was to pick your battles carefully. That made me realize that every hill is not worth dying on and there are more noble and pure causes to have discourse over. This skill is going to help me in my life as a public servant and global citizen and it will always remind me to make sure my motivations are pure and that something is a fight worth fighting.

There it is. I tied together Culture Shock, Vietnam and Plastic Bottles. I reckon Kim McGlyn is to be given credit for that!

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My Life in IB Theater

211-Andreas Makris

by Andreas Makris ’18

I have never been the most outgoing kid. So, the art of theater, in which actors must cast aside any self-consciousness and put their bodies and personalities in the hands of a separate character, might seem like a strange choice of hobby for an introvert such as myself. I would be lying if I said that disregarding other people’s perceptions of me is not a challenging task. However, as I am now half-way through my second year of Mo West’s IB Theater Arts Class, this is a challenge that I have learned to manage and grown to love.

One of my biggest fears when I started acting was abandoning my own identity. Luckily, Mo has helped me work towards overcoming that. She emphasizes Sanford Meisner’s acting techniques, in which the actor does not lose his/her individuality, but rather uses it as a guide to embody a particular role. This preservation of my element is a source of comfort for me. It offers me assurance as I venture into the spirit of another person. Once I can do that, I am free to explore the exciting world of acting.

The last time I was in an after-school production was sophomore year, when I did not yet have the knowledge I have today about theater. Now that I have more experience as an actor, I am looking forward to demonstrating what I have learned in The Laramie Project. Although acting is not an ability that came naturally to me right from the start, this art has become both fun and relieving for me, as it has helped me build confidence to express myself in my everyday life as well.

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What to Pack for Boarding School

340-Amber Salazar

by Amber Salazar ’19

I have been a boarding school student for 2 years now and it seems like each year I somehow manage to forget to pack something important. I’ve always wished that there was a list of things that I should and shouldn’t pack, but I can never seem to find one that is as handy as I would like it to be, so I am going to make a list of my own. Here are the essentials of packing for boarding school.

  • Pack lots of clothes! While you are packing it may seem like you are bringing way too much, but trust me, you’ll need it. Lately the weather has been unpredictable, so make sure to bring clothes for both warm and cold temperatures.
  • Pack different types of shoes. Sometimes you will need sneakers, if it’s cold out you may want to wear boots, or when it’s hot you might want to wear sandals. It is very convenient to have a variety.
  • Bring decorations! The majority of dorm rooms are very bland, so that you can customize it to your liking. Lots of people hang up lights, posters, pictures; really anything that makes it feel more like home.
  • Remember to bring school supplies. You are going to a boarding SCHOOL, after all. Pencils, pens, notebooks, binders, etc.
  • Toiletries! This is probably the most easily forgotten thing to pack. Since you will be living at school, you will need a toothbrush, toothpaste, body wash, deodorant, etc.
  • Bring food. You will be hungry sometimes! If you want a late-night snack or something small to eat in the middle of the day, it is nice to have something to eat in your room.

Overall, the boarding school experience is AMAZING. When you pack the necessary items, the experience just becomes even better.

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Dealing With Roommate Issues

269-Sidney Walters

by Sidney Walters ’19

Boarding school can open your eyes to new ideas, new religions, new cultures etc!  It’s also a great way to get accustomed to living with another person, as you will most likely have to do in college. Roommates can be someone who you can depend on for almost everything. I know that I depend on my roommate for almost everything! But, a roommate is not perfect, which is ok, but it can lead to conflict between the both of you, no matter who the person is. You might be wondering, what do I do in that situation?? Not to worry, I have the answer here for you! But first I will give you a scenario so that you can understand.

Scenario:

Say your roommate is playing music out loud during study hall. (In my room it happens all the time!) Which is totally fine, but tonight you have to take notes in your science book for a really important test tomorrow. You need to have complete quiet in order to do the assignment right. But, you don’t want to come off rude or mean towards your roommate if you ask them to get rid of the music.

What should you do???

You should politely ask them to either turn off their music or use headphones. In my experience, this usually works and we continue with our studies while respecting each other. I am sure if you ask politely and give your roommate alternatives they are sure to respect the space that both of you share.

That is just one example of a roommate issue that can easily be solved without any intervention of an authority figure. But, if by chance you can’t solve the issue yourself, you have prefects and dorm parents to help as well!

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