Tag Archives: student tour guide

Student Leadership at George School

There is never a moment when you are not around a student leader. In the dining hall, on the athletic fields, in the classrooms, and even in your dorm. Our student leaders are all around us and sometimes without us knowing that one is in our presence. From being a curious freshman to needing help with my Pre-Calculus homework, I have always taken advantage of the student leaders around me. They always make me feel like I belong at George School and they are a big part of the many reasons why being here means so much to me. Since I had such a positive experience with the student leaders I interact with, I wanted the opportunity to spread this warmth I felt to others.

I applied for my first leadership position at the end of my sophomore year. I knew that by then I had the necessary tools to handle any situation that was presented to me. I basically had two years of being a student at George School under my belt, which let me familiarize myself with the rules, the adult support, and some connections that have helped me make the most out of my experience here. The position was called a Junior Peer Group Leader; the purpose of peer group is to integrate the newest members of our George School family properly onto our campus. My favorite part of peer group as a freshman was watching Disney movies with pizza, cookies, and soda before my next class. It was such a good break from my chaotic day and I made a lifelong friend because of peer group.

I knew that I would be a good match for the position, but I constantly had concerns about the people not liking me or not planning fun activities or even if they would ever speak to me again after our short time we spent together. All of these feelings quickly vanished when I first met the people I would be spending about an hour a week with. The group was so friendly, outgoing, and always had funny stories to tell the group. We spent most of our time just talking about our George School experiences and what we hope for in the future. We also played silent Hide-and-Go-Seek in the library after eating a bag of clementines. These sessions were the highlight of my week and a breath of fresh air during some stressful times. Being a peer group leader allowed me to form close relationships with different people who I would have never imagined being close to.

Although Junior Peer Group was the first of my leadership positions, it was certainly not my last. I am a Varsity Cheerleading Captain, Lead Tour Guide, and Prefect in Central Main. These positions are all special to me in their own way and when I reflect on why I chose to apply, it all boils down to one reason: George School gave me the confidence to interact with those who you might not initially be close with, but will have the ability to form a genuine connection with these individuals. I am appreciative of the leadership positons I have held/currently hold, and I hope that I have inspired others to follow in my footsteps.

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Why GS is the BEST!

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by Chloe Lentchner ’19

The Community is unlike any other

Never have I ever been a part of a place so warm and welcoming before I arrived at George School. GS is such a unique school because everyone actually cares about you and your success.

You can purse your interests

At George School you will find people who are passionate about so many different things and that is because you are able to explore any interests you may have. The arts department is filled with all sorts of classes such as, theater, painting and drawing, ceramics, woodworking, and dance. While our athletic department has so many sport options such as, swimming, equestrian and field hockey. For students who have interests beyond that you can create a club or join a club like Model UN or Argo (the student run literary magazine). It’s so cool that we all have the chance to continue to dive deeper into things that you love but at the same time, discover new interests.

The Traditions

For being open for 125 years now, GS has acquired a lot of traditions that the students and community as a whole get excited about. One thing that I personally look forward to is Live Music Weekend. LMW is put together by Goldfish n’ Java (a student music club) and is a weekend on campus filled with student performances. I am a musician myself and having the chance to perform with my friends and for my friends is such a fun time.

You can be yourself!

In a community like George School you will be accepted for whoever you are. That’s why I love GS because the people you meet are genuine. By being yourself, you will find friends that you connect with and create lifelong friendships, which is why I think GS is the actual best!


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Celebrating Tradition: Galette Des Rois

by Claire Heydacker ‘18

In France, each year during January, the bakery’s shelves are full of Galette Des Rois. A French tradition, this cake is shared on January 6 to celebrate the arrival of the Three Wise Men in Bethlehem. A Galette Des Rois, is a large cake-sized puff pastry, filled with frangipane, a sort of almond cream. Inside of this galette, is hidden a fève, a small sometimes porcelain figurine.

As the tradition goes, the youngest child hides under the table as the galette is cut, and decides which person gets which piece, without seeing the pieces. After this is done, everyone enjoys their share, and whomever finds the fève in their piece becomes the King or Queen, and gets to wear the cardboard crown provided with the galette.

This is by far one of my favourite holidays to celebrate each year, as it gathers friends and family. Even though I am no longer able to fully participate in this tradition, as it is not celebrated in America, I still keep all my past fèves, and bake galettes in January.

Thanks to George School’s diverse and inclusive community, I’ve actually been able to bring my celebration to our school. Working with George School’s French Club, we’ve since incorporated this holiday. We invite students to take part in the baking of the galettes, the finding of the fève, and the crowning of the King or Queen!

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A Guide to Being a Happy Roommate and Having a Happy Roommate

by Isabella Lin ’18

Prior to coming to George School, I never experienced having a roommate let alone living away from home. As a result, I had no idea what to expect from a roommate, so I envisioned an entire scenario in the days before moving in… I would open the door to my beautiful dorm room, somehow already decorated, and upon seeing me, my roommate would throw up her hands and we would squeal and scream at each other in excitement, instantly becoming the best of friends.

In other words, I believed that roommates were destined to immediately feel a bond, get along perfectly, and live together in bliss and harmony for the rest of the high school years. Spoiler alert: This is likely impossible in all roommate scenarios. However, I do have proof that it’s entirely possible to live in blissful contentment with your roommate when you put in some effort and give it more time than one day.

When I met my roommate Ale, there wasn’t screaming or hair-braiding – we were two awkward and nervous sophomores, hoping that our roommate didn’t have an odd habit that would drive the other crazy. It isn’t an easy task to be assigned to live with someone you’ve never met, and it isn’t supposed to be. But remember, once you conquer high school boarding, college dorm life will be a breeze.

Tip #1: Acknowledge your roommate’s presence! I know this sounds silly, but a simple “good morning” and “good night” can go a long way to build a strong foundation for a long term roommate relationship. Not only does it feel natural to greet someone when you see them first thing in the morning, but it helps to create a friendly and home-y environment in your room.

Tip #2: Work out a sleeping time and waking time. Chances are, you and your roommate will have different sleeping schedules. Discuss this with your roommate as soon as possible so you both have correct information, and you and your roommate will have a happy year of undisturbed sleep. If you are an early-bird, gather your things the night before and position your alarm so that you don’t keep hitting snooze. If you stay up late, find another light source and invest in headphones or earphones.

Tip #3: Get a small bedside light. This correlates with the tip above. If you or your roommate needs a later night than the other, having a small bedside light is a great solution to problems with keeping the room lights on. A small, movable light doesn’t disturb the sleeping roommate, and gives enough light for the awake roommate.

Tip #4: Get a mini fridge and share it. Just do it. And be kind and share it, or if it’s your roommate’s fridge, nicely ask to share it. Stock it up with everything that makes you smile on a Monday. It’s a guaranteed mood-booster for both of you.

Tip #5: Have deep, existential conversations at night. Maybe not as deep as existential reflections, but open yourself up to listen to your roommate’s thoughts, or speak your own. When two roommates are lying awake at night, sometimes conversation is what feels the most natural. Don’t worry, this feeling is mutual, you won’t be left hanging. Talk about stress, interests, hopes, dreams, homesickness, or anything else that comes to mind in the moment. It’s a great way to bond with your roommate, and trust me, losing an hour or so of sleep talking with your roommate is worth it.

If you’re wondering, while I didn’t get my big, magical, and unreasonable moment of meeting my roommate, at the end of the year, I did gain a cherished friend for life. Good luck and happy boarding!

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Loving Dance

by Gia Delia ‘18

Dance at George School is unlike any other class that is offered here. I have been taking dance here since my freshman year, and now as a senior, I have a whole new perspective on dance. The most unique aspect to the dance program is that it is integrated into the normal school day. One moment I would be in math; and five minutes later I would be dancing across the studio for forty-five minutes. It does not even stop there, after the forty-five-minute class I have to go to English class. I found the variety of the George School curriculum to be energizing and motivating.

The dance program teaches students a wide variety of styles, focusing specifically on technique and how the body works through anatomy. Over my four years here, I have been involved in a variation of different dances, from topics on climate change to dancing to a Michael Jackson song. I love the bonds that I have made with my classmates—we have been together since freshman year.

Our classes organizes two performances per year, The Holiday Dance Assembly in December, and Dance Eclectic in April. For each we have one to two weeks of rehearsals at night and over the weekend, and this gives all three of the classes a lot of time to get to know each other. I feel like I have made a second family.

Barb Kibler, our amazing teacher and mentor, works alongside all of us to encourage creativity and the start of the choreographing process. As an IB Diploma candidate, I will take the HL Dance Exam, choreograph three pieces, and write an essay comparing two different styles of dance. Barb has played a huge role in mentoring me during this process. My perspective on dance has matured since I have been here, and I have a greater appreciation for the art as a whole.

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Why I Selected George School

by Sophia Guo ’18

I had no idea what a Quaker school would be like when I first came to visit George School. Instead of perceiving Quakerism as a religion, I perceived it as a set of spiritual values that continuously influence this school community. George School left me the impression of being the most open, friendly, and caring among the eighteen schools I visited in the US, and thus I spontaneously attribute the community’s unique aura to the biggest difference it has from other high schools, that is, Quakerism.

I always learn about the environment from people who live in it. Holding firmly to the belief that a school should not be approved until its people are worth trusting and being friends with. I was not committed to George School by its beautiful campus with squirrels running around, its two-floor library filled with natural light and over two thousand paperbacks as well as ten thousand electronic books, or its modernly designed Fitness Athletics Center with a homeothermal swimming pool, wrestling rooms, yoga rooms, and a supervised fitness center.

Instead, I was gradually convinced to select George School as my first choice through my talk with my tour guide and the community I observed in a very short time period. What surprised me was that people called each other by their first name, even a student to a teacher. It was one of the “SPICES” in Quakerism: simplicity, peace, integrity, community, equality, and service. “People feel that they are responsible for the community,” explained my tour guide, “because everyone is equal.”

I was impressed by the rigor of courses that George School students take. George School provides over 20 AP courses, as well as a full IB program for students who want to challenge themselves academically. Challenging oneself and trying to achieve a higher academic level seems very normal. Not to mention that students also pursue scores of leadership roles and passions. When I told my tour guide that she was very excellent, she blushed a little and told me that she thought “excellence should be a habit.”

It was not “love at first sight” between me and George School. It was the relationship between the kinds of lovers that the more they find out about each other the deeper their love is. Community, culture, and academics were all great reasons why I selected George School.

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Deciding on George School

by Maisy Cadwallader ‘20

I always heard the love story of my grandparents who met in high school. They talked about it often and I was confused because I knew for sure they didn’t live close to each other during those years. One day I asked my grandpa and he said they had attended George School, a boarding school. He told me as well that my father had attended George School too. So, I knew this “George School” had some sentimental meaning to my family.

I forgot about it for a few years until 2010 when at dinner one night my parents asked my brother if he had any interest in going to a boarding school, the same one my father and grandfather had gone to. This struck me and all I had heard about the school from my grandfather came back to me. Initially, I started to cry because my brother would be gone, leaving me to be the only one in the house. Then I got excited because it dawned on me that if he was asked, maybe I would be too.

A few months later my parents piled my brother and I into the car and we headed down for the first look at George School. I fell asleep waking up a bit later to my dad saying, “Here we are!” I looked out the window and was ecstatic. Driving past the campus I was blown away. My young eyes suddenly became filled with hope that this would be my school one day. Turning onto the campus loop we did a full circle. I remember looking at the view from the corner edge of the girls’ soccer fields, past what I now know as the “stairs to nowhere,” and being overcome with a calm feeling. The bright blue sky was the most beautiful thing my eight-year-old eyes had seen.  During the tour I saw the happiness on my father’s face. The smile was one of the biggest I had ever seen from him. During the car ride home, George School was on my mind.

A short five years later, we were sitting at the same dinner table and my parents asked me the same question, if I was interested in boarding school. My face lit up. A few months later, we were once more headed down for another tour of George School. During my tour, the abundant feeling of happiness I had when I had followed my brother on his tour, came rushing back to me. I looked up at my dad and saw the same big smile that I had before. That March when I received my acceptance letter I was overjoyed. I could start to picture my experience here.

Since I have been here it has been amazing. I am glad I get to experience the trials of high school at George School.

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Why Become a Tour Guide

by Liam Mitchell ’19

Every student should feel proud of their school. Proud of the buildings, the history, the athletic teams, and the opportunities available. When I first came to George School in my application process, my tour guide had a profound impact on me and really helped influence my decision to attend here. He was knowledgeable, confident, and carried himself with a certain amount of pride talking about his school.

While becoming a tour guide does require effort, knowledge, and time, becoming one is worth it. For me personally, giving tours is one of my favorite activities at George School. There’s a certain amount of enjoyment I take out of walking prospective families around, especially when I can answer their questions with confidence.

Being a tour guide is all about being the face of George School. I love my school, and I love to show it off. Not only does becoming a tour guide expand your knowledge of the campus, it allows you to meet new people, and expand your people skills. Every tour I go on, I learn something about the family or the prospective student, whether they are from a place I’ve never met someone from, or they participate in an interesting activity that I might not have heard of before.

Being a tour guide, especially a George School tour guide, unlocks new opportunities to expand your horizons and show off your beautiful campus. One of the best feelings is when a family asks a question, and you know the full answer with complete confidence. When families leave George School, they leave with a feeling of satisfaction that they know more about the school than they did when they came in, which is what being a good tour guide is all about.

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A Special Community

by David Mark ’18

My favorite part of George School is our community. I remember coming here freshman year inexperienced and scared for what would come. As soon as I walked into Campbell I felt welcomed and knew that I would be successful here. I was used to being away from home already as I went to a boarding school before, but George school is a place unlike any I’ve ever known.

The community and people are the part that makes up George School and sets it apart from the rest. The feeling you get when you walk into a room full of strangers is usually anxiety and fear, but here when you walk into a room you can’t wait to meet everyone and share your story. Everyone here makes you feel very welcome and wants to get to know the real you. I was shocked about this because I was used to walking down the streets at home staring straight down or ahead. Now, whenever I’m walking I look up and am greeted with a smile from everyone.

I really appreciate everything about the school because it invites you to be yourself in your truest form. No one judges or criticizes you. If you are sitting by yourself simply reflecting, people will recognize that and acknowledge it. I think that anyone who steps foot on this campus will instantaneously fall in love with everyone and everything here.

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Why I Love Writing

by Jayde Dieu ‘20

I have always had a passion for writing. From the moment my hands first felt a book to the first time my pencil touched paper, I knew that it would be essential to me. It is through writing that one can experience the past and determine the future. It is humanity’s greatest superpower.

As a young girl, I kept journals of my life as I experienced it. I still own diaries from my six-year-old self, and they are littered with stories of imaginary friends and sandbox antics. I have journals from my thirteen-year-old self as well, and not even a love expert could convince me that I was not in love with the boy whose name I no longer remember. The freedom I got from expressing myself is a feeling that I have only been able to experience through writing.

As I grew, however, I found that it became increasingly difficult for me to be completely honest when sharing aspects of my story through writing. Human beings naturally fear vulnerability. People often shy away from the idea of sharing their true and complete self with a reader. By writing, an author relinquishes the narrative of their being to the judgement of others, and this is quite possibly the most terrifying act imaginable.

I had to overcome the idea that my tribulations were mine alone. As a young adult, it is quite easy to feel lonely among your challenges even if you are not alone. Everyone carries the burden of their own story, but it is through vulnerability that we, as a society, can lighten each other’s load.

Although it will be difficult, I want to make a difference in this world, and I choose to arm myself with pen and paper.

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