Tag Archives: student tour guide

Loving Dance

by Gia Delia ‘18

Dance at George School is unlike any other class that is offered here. I have been taking dance here since my freshman year, and now as a senior, I have a whole new perspective on dance. The most unique aspect to the dance program is that it is integrated into the normal school day. One moment I would be in math; and five minutes later I would be dancing across the studio for forty-five minutes. It does not even stop there, after the forty-five-minute class I have to go to English class. I found the variety of the George School curriculum to be energizing and motivating.

The dance program teaches students a wide variety of styles, focusing specifically on technique and how the body works through anatomy. Over my four years here, I have been involved in a variation of different dances, from topics on climate change to dancing to a Michael Jackson song. I love the bonds that I have made with my classmates—we have been together since freshman year.

Our classes organizes two performances per year, The Holiday Dance Assembly in December, and Dance Eclectic in April. For each we have one to two weeks of rehearsals at night and over the weekend, and this gives all three of the classes a lot of time to get to know each other. I feel like I have made a second family.

Barb Kibler, our amazing teacher and mentor, works alongside all of us to encourage creativity and the start of the choreographing process. As an IB Diploma candidate, I will take the HL Dance Exam, choreograph three pieces, and write an essay comparing two different styles of dance. Barb has played a huge role in mentoring me during this process. My perspective on dance has matured since I have been here, and I have a greater appreciation for the art as a whole.

Leave a comment

Filed under Student Work, Students

Why I Selected George School

by Sophia Guo ’18

I had no idea what a Quaker school would be like when I first came to visit George School. Instead of perceiving Quakerism as a religion, I perceived it as a set of spiritual values that continuously influence this school community. George School left me the impression of being the most open, friendly, and caring among the eighteen schools I visited in the US, and thus I spontaneously attribute the community’s unique aura to the biggest difference it has from other high schools, that is, Quakerism.

I always learn about the environment from people who live in it. Holding firmly to the belief that a school should not be approved until its people are worth trusting and being friends with. I was not committed to George School by its beautiful campus with squirrels running around, its two-floor library filled with natural light and over two thousand paperbacks as well as ten thousand electronic books, or its modernly designed Fitness Athletics Center with a homeothermal swimming pool, wrestling rooms, yoga rooms, and a supervised fitness center.

Instead, I was gradually convinced to select George School as my first choice through my talk with my tour guide and the community I observed in a very short time period. What surprised me was that people called each other by their first name, even a student to a teacher. It was one of the “SPICES” in Quakerism: simplicity, peace, integrity, community, equality, and service. “People feel that they are responsible for the community,” explained my tour guide, “because everyone is equal.”

I was impressed by the rigor of courses that George School students take. George School provides over 20 AP courses, as well as a full IB program for students who want to challenge themselves academically. Challenging oneself and trying to achieve a higher academic level seems very normal. Not to mention that students also pursue scores of leadership roles and passions. When I told my tour guide that she was very excellent, she blushed a little and told me that she thought “excellence should be a habit.”

It was not “love at first sight” between me and George School. It was the relationship between the kinds of lovers that the more they find out about each other the deeper their love is. Community, culture, and academics were all great reasons why I selected George School.

Leave a comment

Filed under Student Work, Students

Deciding on George School

by Maisy Cadwallader ‘20

I always heard the love story of my grandparents who met in high school. They talked about it often and I was confused because I knew for sure they didn’t live close to each other during those years. One day I asked my grandpa and he said they had attended George School, a boarding school. He told me as well that my father had attended George School too. So, I knew this “George School” had some sentimental meaning to my family.

I forgot about it for a few years until 2010 when at dinner one night my parents asked my brother if he had any interest in going to a boarding school, the same one my father and grandfather had gone to. This struck me and all I had heard about the school from my grandfather came back to me. Initially, I started to cry because my brother would be gone, leaving me to be the only one in the house. Then I got excited because it dawned on me that if he was asked, maybe I would be too.

A few months later my parents piled my brother and I into the car and we headed down for the first look at George School. I fell asleep waking up a bit later to my dad saying, “Here we are!” I looked out the window and was ecstatic. Driving past the campus I was blown away. My young eyes suddenly became filled with hope that this would be my school one day. Turning onto the campus loop we did a full circle. I remember looking at the view from the corner edge of the girls’ soccer fields, past what I now know as the “stairs to nowhere,” and being overcome with a calm feeling. The bright blue sky was the most beautiful thing my eight-year-old eyes had seen.  During the tour I saw the happiness on my father’s face. The smile was one of the biggest I had ever seen from him. During the car ride home, George School was on my mind.

A short five years later, we were sitting at the same dinner table and my parents asked me the same question, if I was interested in boarding school. My face lit up. A few months later, we were once more headed down for another tour of George School. During my tour, the abundant feeling of happiness I had when I had followed my brother on his tour, came rushing back to me. I looked up at my dad and saw the same big smile that I had before. That March when I received my acceptance letter I was overjoyed. I could start to picture my experience here.

Since I have been here it has been amazing. I am glad I get to experience the trials of high school at George School.

Leave a comment

Filed under Student Work, Students

Why Become a Tour Guide

by Liam Mitchell ’19

Every student should feel proud of their school. Proud of the buildings, the history, the athletic teams, and the opportunities available. When I first came to George School in my application process, my tour guide had a profound impact on me and really helped influence my decision to attend here. He was knowledgeable, confident, and carried himself with a certain amount of pride talking about his school.

While becoming a tour guide does require effort, knowledge, and time, becoming one is worth it. For me personally, giving tours is one of my favorite activities at George School. There’s a certain amount of enjoyment I take out of walking prospective families around, especially when I can answer their questions with confidence.

Being a tour guide is all about being the face of George School. I love my school, and I love to show it off. Not only does becoming a tour guide expand your knowledge of the campus, it allows you to meet new people, and expand your people skills. Every tour I go on, I learn something about the family or the prospective student, whether they are from a place I’ve never met someone from, or they participate in an interesting activity that I might not have heard of before.

Being a tour guide, especially a George School tour guide, unlocks new opportunities to expand your horizons and show off your beautiful campus. One of the best feelings is when a family asks a question, and you know the full answer with complete confidence. When families leave George School, they leave with a feeling of satisfaction that they know more about the school than they did when they came in, which is what being a good tour guide is all about.

Leave a comment

Filed under Student Work, Students

A Special Community

by David Mark ’18

My favorite part of George School is our community. I remember coming here freshman year inexperienced and scared for what would come. As soon as I walked into Campbell I felt welcomed and knew that I would be successful here. I was used to being away from home already as I went to a boarding school before, but George school is a place unlike any I’ve ever known.

The community and people are the part that makes up George School and sets it apart from the rest. The feeling you get when you walk into a room full of strangers is usually anxiety and fear, but here when you walk into a room you can’t wait to meet everyone and share your story. Everyone here makes you feel very welcome and wants to get to know the real you. I was shocked about this because I was used to walking down the streets at home staring straight down or ahead. Now, whenever I’m walking I look up and am greeted with a smile from everyone.

I really appreciate everything about the school because it invites you to be yourself in your truest form. No one judges or criticizes you. If you are sitting by yourself simply reflecting, people will recognize that and acknowledge it. I think that anyone who steps foot on this campus will instantaneously fall in love with everyone and everything here.

Leave a comment

Filed under Student Work, Students

Why I Love Writing

by Jayde Dieu ‘20

I have always had a passion for writing. From the moment my hands first felt a book to the first time my pencil touched paper, I knew that it would be essential to me. It is through writing that one can experience the past and determine the future. It is humanity’s greatest superpower.

As a young girl, I kept journals of my life as I experienced it. I still own diaries from my six-year-old self, and they are littered with stories of imaginary friends and sandbox antics. I have journals from my thirteen-year-old self as well, and not even a love expert could convince me that I was not in love with the boy whose name I no longer remember. The freedom I got from expressing myself is a feeling that I have only been able to experience through writing.

As I grew, however, I found that it became increasingly difficult for me to be completely honest when sharing aspects of my story through writing. Human beings naturally fear vulnerability. People often shy away from the idea of sharing their true and complete self with a reader. By writing, an author relinquishes the narrative of their being to the judgement of others, and this is quite possibly the most terrifying act imaginable.

I had to overcome the idea that my tribulations were mine alone. As a young adult, it is quite easy to feel lonely among your challenges even if you are not alone. Everyone carries the burden of their own story, but it is through vulnerability that we, as a society, can lighten each other’s load.

Although it will be difficult, I want to make a difference in this world, and I choose to arm myself with pen and paper.

Leave a comment

Filed under Student Work, Students

College Application Stress

by Patrick Mahoney ’18

The beginning of senior year is always a stressful time. There are countless things to keep up with, nagging parents, everybody who asks where you are going to school, and all the deadlines that seem to be far away, but creep up in no time.

I wanted to apply to become a chemical engineer and although that might be a lofty goal, it is something that interests me. The College Counseling office, specifically Tova who was my college counselor, helped me figure out where I wanted to apply, shared a good schedule to follow for when what things should be done, and answered any questions I had about the college process.

Now most of my applications are turned in, but my college application anxiety has not faded. I will always be worrying about what schools I will get into and if I will be accepted into my top choice. Tova is always there to help me out, however, she helps me stay calm and manage my level of stress. Even though I know she has many students asking her questions and wanting her to look over things, she always has time to either meet with me or to revise any writing that I send her way.

George School is not only great for how they handle the application process, but that type of care pervades the entire school. It shows up in admissions, the course selection process, and your every school day as a whole. George School is a great place. You always know you have the support of the whole community for any problems that you might have.

Leave a comment

Filed under Student Work, Students

Music Girl

 

by Michelle Tyson ’18

So I find myself at quite a busy place right now. I have studied music for four years at George School and have become known as THE “Music Girl.” It is not against my will, though, do not get me wrong. I love music. I came into George School loving music and will leave pursuing a musical path.

In my opinion, it would be an absurdity for me to not love music fiercely. You can see it on my transcript: I have taken Instrumental Music and IB Music for every year I could take them. I’m also involved in the Youth Orchestra of Bucks County, a nearby youth orchestra which meets just five minutes off of campus. There, I’m the second chair violist for the symphony orchestra of the advanced division. I am a member with Goldfish ‘n Java, our school’s live music club. I’m pretty entrenched in music. Beyond that, though, believe it or not, I find so many more music-making opportunities.

During my Arizona service trip over the summer, George School’s dance teacher, Barb Kibler, happened to be a faculty sponsor for the trip. It was down time in our busy day, and our group was gathered in one room of our house. I decided to share the music that I produce with the group, playing some songs off of my recent album on my speaker. Long story short, Barb heard, and asked if I would collaborate with the dance program this year. I accepted.

Barb and I will work together to choreograph five dances to five of my songs for Dance Eclectic. It is the first project of its kind that Barb has undertaken, and also a big but fulfilling challenge for me.

I do share my music on my social media, and my George School peers have started to take notice. My friend recently asked me to write a score for her film project, and I’m working on that project as well.

Dave Nolan, the instrumental and voice music teacher, is working with me on a solo piece for the spring instrumental concert. Also, the George School Community Choir, which meets each Sunday, will need a violist to perform Mozart’s Requiem with them.

My point? There is a place for everyone at George School. If you are a music nerd, that’s okay. I am too! And it’s a really, really, fun time. To any potential music-makers reading this who are hesitant about their future, I suggest to them: just go for it. This also goes for anyone with a particular passion—from soccer, to politics.

My music experience at George School has been a direct result of my pushing for my own passions to be fulfilled. And that’s an invaluable opportunity that every student finds here at George School.

Leave a comment

Filed under Student Work, Students

Managing Stress

by Aaron Zhao ‘19

Stress plays a major part of every high school student’s life; however, George School is the ideal place to cope with it. As an international student, I have come a great distance from home and am managing the long separation from my family. In the beginning, both physical and emotional feelings impacted me. Nevertheless, organizations and people are here at George School to ensure everyone’s well-being from consultation sessions with faculty members to simply just talking to one of the student members of SAGE (Students Associated for Greater Empathy). At the same time, stress is not consistently a negative emotion or feeling. Oftentimes, just the right amount of stress encourages me to avoid procrastination and learn self-discipline.

George School stimulates the development of individuality through the freedom of learning, not only for boarding students, but for day students as well. Every night I attend the two-hour study hall in Mollie Dodd Anderson Library to complete assignments and study with other students. In addition, term exams can be overwhelming for some students, but at George School there are people at the Learning Center who are always there to assist students with any problems.

From a personal experience, adapting to the George School environment was difficult at first, but becoming acclimated to the workload I slowly developed time management, collaboration skills with groups, individuality, coping abilities, and adaptability.

Leave a comment

Filed under A Day in the Life, Student Work, Students

You Know You’re a George School Student When:

by Julia Wilson and Grace Clark

1. You get up close and personal with a squirrel.

Rumor has it that one stole a piece of pizza right from a student’s hands.

 

2. You eat Bettye’s cookies more than once a week.

They’re better than your Grandma’s.

 

3. The activity you get most competitive in is playing foursquare.

You are recruited Division 1 foursquare for college.

 

4. You have rolled down South Lawn more than once.

Or maybe you just slid on the Student Council Slip n’ Slide.

 

5. You think some alumni are still students.

They’re always here.

 

6. You religiously follow @GSculinart on Instagram.

Smokin’ Sean can cook up some good fried rice.

 

7. You’re confident that you and your friends are the last people on earth to use a film camera and lab.

But it is so cool, you wouldn’t have it any other way.

 

8. When you find a “Mind the Light” sticker from 10 years ago on your dorm room light switch.

They are everywhere.

 

9. You don’t “step on the circle” because it’s bad luck.

You also have searched for the steam tunnels and gone ghost hunting in Tate House.

 

10. Either you or one of your friends has dressed up as your teacher for Halloween.

Ralph Lelii and Travis are popular choices.

Leave a comment

Filed under A Day in the Life, Student Work, Students