Tag Archives: music

Georgestock

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Students gather in Marshall Center where Georgestock was held due to inclement weather.

by Bea Feichtenbiner ’19

Coming to George School next weekend is Georgestock. As Paris Parker ’17 wrote in a recent email to the school, “LMW + outdoors + Hallowell + sunset + food= Georgestock. Woodstock + George School – all the questionable stuff= Georgestock. Tunes + jams= a dope addition to footbag club weekend.” No one is exactly sure what Georgestock will be. It’s the first year anyone has done it. There will be music, fun activities, fundraisings, and a smattering of other activities on May 13, 2017 from 5:30-10:30 on Hallowell Porch and South Lawn. The leaders of Footbag Club, along with Goldfish and Java, invite everyone and expect people to have a great time.

Footbag Club is hosting Georgestock. Footbag Club is a newly formed club led by Andrew Arth ’19, Thomas Kumar ’17, Julian Lindenmaier ’18, Alec Palmiotti ’17, Sundar Pratt ’17, and Charles Ryan ’17. A select group of twenty-five or thirty members get together ­­­­once a week to play hacky sack and hang out. Georgestock was created in combination with Paris Parker and the rest of Goldfish and Java, as it is a live music event.

Goldfish and Java are responsible for some of the most entertaining events on campus, including Live Music Weekend and Spring Fling. For the first time, they are hosting yet another outdoor music performance. The main organizers are Paris, Alec, and Sydney Johnson ’17, with help from Sundar, Thomas, and Caleigh Hoffman ’18. So far, about 9-15 groups have signed up, but more are expected in the next couple of days. There also will be a special appearance from the band Liz De Lise.

Everyone who wants to perform just fills out a form to let Paris know what music and instruments are needed and they are on the set list. Paris has sent out a few emails with the form and there are more to come. He also carries a few with him so people can get them directly from him.

“GS Alumni Ethan Carpene had the idea, but so did GS alumni Justin Daniel Becker,” Paris said. “Sadly, it was never realized and now we have resurrected the corpse of this idea and tried to make it a reality.”

While people listen to their peers perform and enjoy all the other activities Footbag Club have, people can also sign up to fundraise. Coordinated by Sydney, clubs, classes, and whoever else wants to can sign up to raise money for any cause by selling food, clothing, or other items. When asked to describe Georgestock, Paris replied, “Imagine a scene where George School students are sprawled across South Lawn on (provided) blankets listening to dank tunes while eating food and watching the sun set. The moon rises and the party continues. It supports George School arts and artists. It seeks to return GS to its organic, outdoors roots while also providing a bumpin’ time. There is which bonds communities more than music, food, and carefree moments.”

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Sing and Experience

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Image used with permission from Wikimedia Commons as open source.

A chance to sing live and have your life change forever

by Katherine Hoang ’19

You love to sing. You want to become famous. You want to be coached by the world’s top artists. What could be better than doing what you love while earning fame and money?

Ever since the beginning of the twenty-first century, thousands of television shows ranging from comedy to music have been launched. Among the many television singing competitions is a show called The Voice, which was first broadcast on April 26, 2011 by NBC. With a unique competition format, The Voice quickly surpassed other big singing shows like American Idol and X Factor in the ratings, and its audience and number of participants have steadily grown over the years.

Unlike American Idol or The X Factor, the first part of competing on The Voice involves a “Blind Audition” round. To ensure that the coaches only judge contestants’ voices rather than their appearances, the coaches do not face them while they perform their act. If the coach wants the participant to be on their team, they will push a red button allowing their seat to turn around and face the lucky contestant. If multiple coaches turn around, they will each try to persuade the contestants to choose them over the others – making this round the most entertaining of the entire show, in my opinion.

Following that, the contestants go through a “Battle Round,” in which they must sing a song with another member on the same team. The coach then picks one contestant out of the two from that sing-off to advance in the competition. Next, the contestant must face the “Knockout Round” where they sing against another participant on the same team. The coach must choose one person to continue the competition.

Once they make it through those rounds, the contestants head off to the “Live Shows” where they will perform live. Each week, each contestant has a solo performance and a group performance with his or her team, coach, or a guest. They are eliminated one by one until the winner is chosen.

Not only does The Voice provide a different competition format, but it also gives the contestants many opportunities. Shantel Hubert, an English teacher at George School who used to be a professional singer, shared her views: “I think it is great for the contestants to be given a chance to work with the coaches as well as producers of the show. As a singer, […] the more experience you have, the better you become. Because you know what to expect, you are not as nervous.”

Shantel further commented on the different experiences contestants gain: “I think putting the singers through different trials, in front of the judges and on stage, is very good practice for what’s to come.” Overall, Shantel believed strongly that The Voice prepares contestants nicely to become stars.

It has only been five years since the show first started, but The Voice has produced many successful artists, such as Cassadee Pope (Season Three), Melanie Martinez (Season Three), Danielle Bradbery (Season Four), and Jordan Smith (Season Nine).

With the show stepping into its twelfth season, The Voice is starring four impressive coaches: Adam Levine, Blake Shelton, Alicia Keys, and Gwen Stefani, replacing Miley Cyrus from last season.

The show’s audience is expected to have a blast as two amazing female artists are in the house.

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International Student Assembly – From my Point of View

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by Bea Feichtenbiner ’19

George School’s International Student Assembly takes place every winter and students of all nationalities look forward to it. There are a variety of acts—from singing and dancing to Kung Fu and magic tricks. This year, Jason Chien’s ’18 Kung Fu performance was authentic right down to the clothing. Kiana Wong ’17, from Jamaica, performed an amazing modern dance to a popular song Don’t Judge Me by Chris Brown. Anney Ye ’20 and Jennifer Chang ’19 sang a popular Chinese song.

The International Student Assembly is one of my favorites each year. Students from all cultures, nationalities, and ethnicities have a chance to show off some of their many talents. American students get a chance to be immersed in traditions from all over the world. The assembly is enlightening, introspective, and entertaining. The audience can tell that the performers are having fun. Everyone has international friends at George School, and everyone wants to see their friends perform. I believe the International Student Assembly brings George School students closer to their roots—and to each other.

George School is home to hundreds of students, representing forty-three different countries. So why is it that students stay away from the unfamiliar when deciding what to perform? I imagine they could feel like their traditions won’t be respected, but what I think is more likely, after having spent so much time in the United States, they begin to assume American culture as their own. I would think the performers want to choose something they know, so the songs they hear on the radio on a regular basis are a good place to start. Maybe culturally traditional performances are harder to prepare or recognize. Being from the United States myself, I cannot explain the reasons for why international students choose the performances they do. I suppose it all depends on the student and how close they feel to their culture. Either way—culturally diverse performances or not—the international student assembly is not one to miss.

 

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