Category Archives: Admission Office

Top 10 Ways You Know You’re a George School Student

by Alice Ke ’19

1. You call teachers by their first name!

Hey Kevin! Hey Faith! Relationships with teachers are casual and friendly. You might see them as a teacher or a mentor in the classroom, but they are also there for you as a friend.

2. You’ve sprinted up the hill from the Mollie Dodd Anderson Library to McFeely.

We all dread that long walk from one end of campus to the complete opposite, hopefully your teacher will understand why you are late.

3. You get excited for the games against rival Westtown!

Support our sports teams! Moose Points! Moose Cup! Everyone gets hyped to come out and cheer on our Friends Schools League rival Westtown. The energy is amazing for both the team and the crowd of Cougar crazy fans.

4. You may technically be a day student, but let’s be real, you’re pretty much a boarder since you spend so much time on campus.

Dinner and study hall during the weekdays are staples for most day students. Activities on Fridays and over the weekend are the best of times—ranging from fairs to movies, and Student Council Weekend.

5. You’ve heard everyone talk about the IB program and how it’s so rigorous.

In truth, it’s hard. International Baccalaureate is one of George School’s most renowned programs, and those who choose to do the classes or diploma know that they’re getting into an academically challenging curriculum. Between internal assessments and the IB exams, it is a lot of work, but the recognition and diploma in the end are the ultimate feeling of satisfaction.

6. You’ve witnessed a dance battle happen on Red Square due to a Four Square disagreement.

Four Square gets intense. An iconic George School tradition enjoyed by everyone on campus. Sometimes disagreements break out on who is to blame for the ball going out, or if the ball even did go out. The only way to settle such a brawl is simple: a dance battle.

7. You’ve heard conversations in at least three different languages across campus.

With a wide diversity of international students on campus, you’re bound to hear a foreign language you’ve never heard before and could not fathom understanding. Chances are you can probably pick up phrases from some of these languages from an international friend and feel accomplished!

8. You’ve spent an afternoon relaxing (and possibly napping) on South Lawn.

After a long day, if it’s nice outside, South Lawn is the ultimate spot to unwind and destress on a nice day.

9. STICKY BUNS!

An iconic George School dessert. Sticky buns. The most gooey, delicious treats you’ll find in the dining hall. Bless the days that you see sticky buns waiting for you on the dessert platter.

10. You’ve found a family here.

The sense of community is by far the strongest of the Quaker values (Simplicity, Peace, Integrity, Equality, Community, Stewardship) that George School embodies. Ranging from students, to faculty, to staff, to pets, and many others, the George School community is one that simply cannot be replicated. It is what makes George School feel like home.

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Filed under A Day in the Life, Admission Office, dorm life, Students

What is it like to be a Day Student at a Boarding School?

by Andrew Arth ’19

In a word: exceptional. Truly, it is the best of both worlds. As a freshman coming into George School I was worried about the mixing of day students and boarding students, the potential divisions between us, and the differences between our experiences. My first practice of varsity soccer my freshman year, all of these apprehensions went away; immediately, I was greeted by two senior boarders, one from Seoul and one from Los Angeles. It was difficult to be the only freshman on a team composed of mainly upperclassmen, but I soon found comfort in the comradery and brotherhood of the group. We ate meals together, worked out together, did homework together, and just spoke about how our weeks were. This is just one example of my relationships with boarders.

In a much broader sense, being a day student at GS allows for all of the positives of a boarding atmosphere to combine with the comforts of home. GS has a very even balance between boarding and day population (53% boarding, 47% day to be exact) and this creates a very homogenous community in which separations due to race, gender, ethnicity, or where students sleep simply do not exist. I find myself staying on campus for study hall, attending games on the weekends, or participating in various weekend activities that are mainly directed towards boarders. I do not feel out of place; many of my best friends are boarders.

The best part of being a day student is that if I need the comfort of my own bed, a home cooked meal, or just time with my dog, my house is only ten minutes down the road.

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Residential Life

by Vanessa Baker ’19

Living in the dorm has been the best part of my George School experience. Being from Michigan, I was pretty homesick when I first arrived at George School my freshman year, but the dorm staff and my friends made me feel unbelievably comfortable. There are four adults that live in each dorm and there are also four senior prefects who are leaders in the dorm and they help the dorm staff run the dorm.

Both my freshman and sophomore years I formed strong relationships with the seniors that lived with me, particularly the ones on my floor. The seniors had the almost awkward role of older sister while also being an authoritarian, but they were important role models for me while I was an underclassman. I also got to know some of the adults in the community through their role as dorm parents. One of the jokes I’ve laughed the hardest at is one my sophomore dorm head told me one night after check-in. I don’t even remember the joke, all I remember is physically rolling on the ground howling with laughter with another one of my friends.

The best part of living in the dorm, however, is getting to live with my friends—basically a nonstop slumber party. The bonds I’ve formed with the girls in my dorm are most definitely the relationships I’m going to cherish the most when I leave George School, which unfortunately will be sooner rather than later.

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Choosing Boarding School

by Shaina Gonzales ’19

The funny thing is, I never planned boarding school to be my future.

In fact, I didn’t even know it was an option—and even when I did find out halfway through my middle school years, I waved off the very thought of it. Besides, I thought, aren’t boarding schools for kids who want to get away from their families? A thing that only exists in books? A place for bad kids? A place that certain people had the privilege of attending?  I had a limited perspective on boarding school, but nevertheless, I was already dismissing this possibility out of the picture.

Most importantly, boarding school was impossible for me to consider, since I’m an only child of a single mother. My entire life, it’s always been me and my mom, and I couldn’t bear the thought of leaving her alone for four high school years. She was on the same page with me, until eighth grade, when my high school placement program came into effect. I think the pivotal moment where both of our minds changed was when we listened to an alumni’s parent share her experience with sending her daughter to boarding high school—she was a single parent with an only child, making it instantly relatable for us.

Intrigued, I recall the mother telling her story— the pains of sending her daughter off to a faraway place, having to continue daily life without watching her daughter grow through high school, being a distant figure from her teenaged child. But then, she stated she doesn’t regret the choice she and her daughter made, and would do it all over again. She saw how happy and satisfied her daughter was from attending boarding school. The mother understood that the boarding experience was an experience that benefited her daughter— an experience day schools can’t offer.

I think that personal story was the catalyst for choosing boarding school. I was moved and intrigued by it, but still a little hesitant. In my twelve year old mind, it didn’t matter what I wanted – what mattered was if me and my mom mutually agreed, because we are a team. However, my mom was also gripped by the alumni’s parent experience.

I remember clearly her turning to me, taking my hand, and whispering, “Let’s give this a try.”

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Tips for Newly Accepted International Students at George School

by Elenore Wang ’18

As I am munching on lotus flavored moon cake from Lan, our Chinese teacher, I realize it is the fourth Mid-Autumn Festival that I have spent at George School. It has been four years since I flew across the earth from a Chinese public school to George School, a place that seemed so strange but full of opportunities to the ninth grade me at the time. Looking back, I can say my four years here as an international student have been very happy and fulfilling. If you follow my advice below, I promise you too will have a fabulous journey at George School.

1. Be yourself

I know it is a cliché, but this really is the key to happiness at George School. When I first came to campus, I felt compelled to ingratiate myself with American kids by pretending to be someone I am not, because I was afraid of being different. Later, I realized this concern was completely unnecessary, because George School is the most accepting place you will ever find. Pretending is exhausting and futile, for everyone at George School respects and values individuality. If you are confident just being yourself, friends will come to you and you will be much happier.

2.    Don’t be afraid and try your best

George School offered me countless opportunities to do things I never thought I could do before. Not only did I have fun trying things out, but I also found my passion—film. I took film class my sophomore year and immediately fell in love with it. Now, I am known among my friends as “the filmmaker” and I am happy about it. Before I made my first film I was terrified, because I had zero experience. However, the tremendous support and encouragement that George School offered me eliminated my fear of failure. Feel free to try anything you like—sports, like lacrosse, or arts, like film. As long as you are willing to give your maximum effort, you have no reason to be afraid because you will succeed.

3.    Have fun!

Always remember that George School wants you to have fun. Please do not over-stress yourself and enjoy the George School years to come!

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George School Visits the Happy Island of Bermuda – 2017

by John Stevens ‘02

For the past three years, I have enjoyed summer weather in September, as my George School Admission travel has taken me to the Schools to Know Fair in Bermuda. A warm atmosphere has always appealed to me, and over the years, I have spent significant time visiting many islands, but Bermuda is my favorite.

Yes, the climate is wonderful, the views are breathtaking, and the food is delicious, but what separates Bermuda from the others is the people. During my visits, I have connected with hundreds of students, dozens of school officials, and countless Bermudians. Teachers and administrators are patient and dedicated, local business owners are creative and talented, and taxi drivers proudly wave and smile as they drive about the island. The people are happy, and they have always made this oblivious tourist feel safe and welcome.

This year’s trip was extra special, as I was provided the opportunity to visit and present to several schools. As I walked through the hallways, everyone made eye contact, and greeted me with a smile or a “morning” or “good afternoon.” During presentations, students took notes, listened intently, and asked thoughtful questions. When it was time for me to leave, they each shook my hand and thanked me for my time. Mutual courtesy is important to me, and Bermudian children are the most gracious I have encountered.

I was also fortunate to be joined by parents of current George School students for the two day Schools to Know Fair. In my opinion, parents are the most important ambassadors for schools because their feelings can be entrusted as 100% genuine. I love George School, both as an alumnus and admission officer, but I am unable to represent the feelings of a parent whose child is truly happy in a school environment. These parents are happy because their children are happy, and they conveyed this happiness to both myself and prospective families.

I am thankful to have spent time in such a beautiful country, with such happy, gracious people, and I look forward to the next group of Bermudians joining the George School community.

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Filed under Admission Office, Alumni, Faculty and Staff, Life After George School

Coming Full Circle

by Kim Major, associate director of admission

Last week was my favorite week of the year, hands down. While my children think I am crazy (they think the last day of summer vacation is the worst!), I know I am right. You see, last week was orientation for our new students and the start of our new academic year here at George School.

So, why was that the best? I mean, the start of the academic year to faculty and admission officers means back to long workdays. It means many, many meetings. It means late nights, tired eyes, and no more trips to the beach or the pool. I already miss those trips to the beach and the pool. HOWEVER, what it also means is that I get to see the fruits of last year’s labor. All of the students with whom I worked so hard last year – at admission events, in interviews, in follow-up phone calls, meetings, and emails – I get to see all of them on campus, here and now as students!

Over the last year, I got to know 170 new students, most of them in person in some capacity. I knew we admitted a rocketry wizard, and I got to make sure our robotics and engineering faculty knew about her. I knew we had at least four students who count ukulele as a big-time hobby, and I got to let them know about one another (some pretty cool jam sessions are about to go down in our dorms). I knew that one of our students had a really challenging summer and was feeling a bit down, and I got to make sure his advisor was prepared to offer a little extra love. I got to understand, before the rest of the school, that our new students are going to knock the socks off of our faculty and returning students. Now everyone gets to know it and I get to see the joy that brings.

Many people see admission officers as gatekeepers, standing at the school doors and judging who gets to come in. While we certainly have a difficult task in making admission decisions, we aren’t gatekeepers. No, I see myself more as a matchmaker. Through the admission process, I help students to navigate the admission process (and sometimes that means helping them to find a match that is better suited to their particular needs). And, when the school year starts, my matchmaker skills kick into high gear as the entire school prepares to welcome them. I help in the faculty advising and roommate pairing processes and work with families to match them with the resources they will need to get started here at George School.

So, when move-in and registration days roll around, it all comes together, and it is magic. The best part? I know that I have two, three, or four years more with these students and I get to see all the dreams they talked about in the application process come true – and I get to see them discover new dreams they didn’t even know they had!

That, to me, is what makes George School so special. New students aren’t a number. Each new student is a person, a part of a family, a dreamer, a do-er, an artist, an athlete, and so much more. When they start their first day here, they start with many, many people knowing quite a bit about who they are, and they already have a jumpstart in helping them to reach their goals.

Here’s to another terrific year!

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Filed under A Day in the Life, Admission Office, Faculty and Staff, Students

Why I Said Yes to GS

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Bea, seen here in her Oxford University Sweatshirt, works with another student on the Curious George. 

By Bea Feichtenbiner ‘19

George School is so much more than I thought it would be. In seventh grade, I began thinking about colleges. I know that is early, but I have always been hyper focused on my future. During this time, I wanted to major in English and obsessed with England. I decided that I wanted to go to the University of Oxford in Oxford, England, and I would do anything necessary to get there. I learned of the International Baccalaureate (IB) Diploma from a family friend and I looked it up. Only two schools within an hour of my house offered the diploma. I knew this would help me get into my dream school, so I convinced my mom to let me look at them. The first school, Harriton High School in Lower Merion School District, was the closest to my house, but I would have to move to attend school there. George School was the second closest.

Neither my mom nor I felt any harm in applying, so I started the application. I went for a tour in October and I loved it. It just felt right. I finished my application and anxiously awaited a decision. The portal said decisions would be posted at midnight, so I planned to stay up. When the clock hit twelve, I logged in and sure enough, my decision was there. “Congratulations,” I read.

The next morning, I logged on again at 6:30 a.m. “Congratulations,” I read again. I ran upstairs to wake my mom up. She was excited, but we both knew what this meant: we had to decide whether or not I should go.

After I pondered it for a couple of weeks, I convinced myself that I needed to say yes to GS. I made a PowerPoint of pros and cons and presented it to my mom. We accepted the admission a week before it was due.

Then I had to tell my friends and my family. Some were shocked and some were not, but for the most part, everyone supported me. I got many comments about how I was “brave” or “crazy.” I didn’t understand this. Going to George School felt natural, I didn’t need to be brave or crazy. I felt like I belonged. That didn’t stop the butterflies in my stomach when I actually got ready to go though. For the first few hours, I was convinced I hated it. But then it got easier and I made new friends.

I am not going to lie, even now, three months away from my junior year, I sometimes feel like I made a terrible mistake. I miss my family and my friends, I miss my old life. But I don’t really regret it. I have my moments of doubt, but it has been a great opportunity and I am not going to waste it wondering about what might have been. George School is one of the best things to ever happen to me—it has a way of making you belong, no matter who you are.

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This Post Is Brought to You by Hubcaps, Texas, and the Letter A.

by Colleen Smith, Admission Office

It’s the most wonderful time of the year.

Applications have been read, accepted students have been celebrated, and now it’s time to welcome the new students of George School!

George School enjoyed a record high number of applications, a 14 percent increase over last year’s total, which meant difficult choices as the admission committee selected among many qualified students. Continue reading

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An Interview with Dawn, parent ’16

An interview with Dawn, parent ’16 conducted by Chloe ’16. Read on to find out what Dawn’s fears were about boarding school, how she came to terms with them, and the difference it has made for her family.  You can also check out some of Chloe’s other posts on the blog including: Pumpkin Spice Oreos, Filling Your Empty Canvases (Making a Dorm Room Feel Like a Home, Not a Box), and Speaking of Squirrels.

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Chloe and her mom at a George School softball game.

How did you decide boarding school was the right fit for your child?

Initially, I was very hesitant. Sure, Chloe had been to her share of sleepovers and overnight camps. But none of these had lasted for more than a week at a time. And although, as a little girl, she had spent a whole summer abroad without me, she had stayed with family then, not a bunch of strangers at a faraway school.

My willingness to consider boarding school grew over time. At first I was only willing to consider “local” boarding schools — schools inside of the tri-state area. I figured if I could get to her, driving, in an hour or less, the distance wouldn’t be such a frightening thought. After spending a couple of days visiting a school in Connecticut, meeting other boarders there, and seeing Chloe make her way around the campus, the idea of letting her go a little further away began to seem less scary. On the ride to and from Connecticut, I realized how close New Haven was to New York. A couple of my very good friends from college live there, and it occurred to me that even though I would be several hours away, they would be able to get to Chloe in far less time if needed.

Then I started thinking about all of the places where we had family or very close friends who I could count on to be surrogate family in a pinch. I thought of my own experiences as an undergrad (and even a grad student) living far from home. I thought about all of the really strong friendships that came of my time away from home. I realized that those friends became my chosen family, and that college and grad school was my home away from home. That’s when the boarding school decision became an easy one to make. That’s when I realized that it was the right fit, not just for Chloe, but for me, too. Continue reading

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