Category Archives: A Day in the Life

Weekends at George School

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by Zau Haskins ’21

One of the most fun ways to end a week and take your mind off stress from school is during a GS weekend. Each weekend on campus is planned with a theme and includes many activities and fun trips to go on. There is never a bland time on campus because there is always something you could do! Some of the weekends on campus include Upper and Lower Dorm Weekends which encompass bar-b-ques, a great selection of movies to see with friends, ice cream socials with the members of your dorm and other dorms to get to know new people, mall trips, and even late-night food trips! My favorite weekend at GS is Harvest Weekend. This usually takes place during the fall time where it is cold outside so some of the activities include hot chocolate in Marshall, haunted Hayrides with friends around campus, s’more roasting, pumpkin carving, and apple butter making just to name a few. My favorite part about this weekend is seeing not only GS students coming out to the different events, but also seeing faculty families and other local families coming together and having a great time. This was very exciting to me witnessing how friendly and welcoming the GS community is to everyone which is the foundation of a Quaker Community!

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The Importance of an Advisor

Collection

Sarah with her Advisor and collection group

by Sarah Mayer ’21

When I started freshmen year George School I was a little nervous regarding the amount of time and effort that would be required to meet the rigorous academic requirements. Since then I have grown to appreciate the academics and emotional support that is provided. George School really focuses on our mental health since they realize the amount of work that is given plus the additional stresses of extracurricular activities puts a lot of pressure on us. When you join the community you will be randomly assigned an advisor. An advisor is a faculty member who meets with you along with 3-6 other students 3 times a week. The advisor is someone who you can go to for any reason and is there to ensure you are successful. Another academic support GS provides are consultations, which are when you meet with a teacher for guidance academically. For example, you need to go over some material or any other issue that would need to be consulted there is time allotted at the end of the day to do so. Another option is, each night during study hall there is writing, language, math, and other services to help you with whatever you may be having trouble with. Overall GS provides a very helpful support system.

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Meet Andrew, Class of 2019

Andrew Arth

by Andrew Arth ’19 

Hello Friends, to begin I would like to introduce myself.  I am Andrew Arth, a senior day student, IB Diploma candidate and two sport varsity athlete.  I will be taking you through my first term of my senior year at GS, but first you should get to know me a little better.  The story starts with my brother, who graduated in 2014 and showed me what George School was, what it is, and what it could be.  I fell in love with it at first sight, infatuated and drawn in by the sprawl of South Lawn, the history of the brick, and the energy of the students.  Fast forward, almost eight years and here I am.  I am a co-founder and leader of a club, 2 year member of the Discipline Committee, a 3x varsity captain, a writing center mentor, and perhaps most importantly writing this blog to you, the reader, right now.  This is my most important task to date because I want to share what George School means to me and what it could possibly mean to you.  There will be ups and downs, highs and lows, victories and losses, but most importantly there will be one constant: George School.  It is the glue which holds our very community together. Let me share it with you.  Signing out for now.

 

-Andrew

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Meet Zau, Class of 2021

Zau H. '21

Each term, George School Ambassadors will write blogs detailing the George School experience through their eyes. We hope you enjoy meeting Zau ’21 and following her George School journey.

Hey Everybody!

My name is Zau Haskins and I am a sophomore boarder! As an eighth grader on my tour at George School, I was drawn to how friendly and warm the environment was. One of the main reasons I said yes to GS and became a tour guide was because my tour guide was very joyful, and her energy was contagious, she created a safe space for conversation for an observant and quiet person like I was and continued a connection with me while entering the school as a freshman. Coming from Atlanta, Georgia, adjusting to a new school in a completely different region without my parents was a challenge of my maturity as a young adult. While in middle school, I was very reliant on my parents. They would always check in on me to make sure I was on top of my work. When the thought of going to a boarding school was introduced as an option for me, I immediately considered it because I wanted to become more dependent on myself so that when I go to college I am prepared to knock out any obstacles that come my way. George School made this transition very easy for me because there was always an opportunity to be involved with the community through different clubs, collections, sports, and much more! Overall, George School is a very comfortable, welcoming environment to be in and easy to get accustomed to even living hours away from your home.

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Meet Sarah, Class of 2021

Sarah Mayer '21

Each term, George School Ambassadors will write blogs detailing the George School experience through their eyes. We hope you enjoy meeting Sarah ’21 and following her George School journey.

Hello Everyone,

My name is Sarah Mayer and I’m a sophomore day student. Over the last two years, I have grown to love this community both academically and socially. A few of my passions are musical theater, science (specifically medicine), and hanging out with my friends. The friendships I have made are sure to last a lifetime. Another aspect of George school that I like is the diversity. I have met students from around the world including France, China, and India. Initially, I was introduced to the Friends or Quaker Community when I attended Buckingham Friends School. Each week for the last ten years I have been attending Quaker Meeting for Worship. Meeting For Worship is held once or twice a week when the whole community will sit in a shared silence to reflect on one’s thoughts, and if they feel moved to speak they can share these thoughts. Another reason I have really enjoyed attending a Quaker school is the thoughtful community where the teachers ensure an academically friendly community. I said yes to GS because of the friendly academic community where everyone can prosper in their own way whether it be academically, athletically, artistically, or whatever path you choose.

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What to Pack for George School?

39-Ben McCormick

By Ben McCormick ’18

What makes you feel at home? How would you bring this sense of home to George School? Of course, it’s easy enough to pack necessities, such as linens and hygiene products, but how is it possible to make your dorm feel like home? Pack as little as possible – only the necessities. If you find as though you’ve forgotten something, take it as an opportunity to explore the community surrounding George School, like Summit Square or Newtown. Don’t stress yourself out by trying to pack every little thing you could possibly need. Enjoy the process. In complete honesty, I did the same and overpacked, and I didn’t need the vast amounts of decorations that I initially thought I needed. Throughout your time at George School you will accumulate so many memories and so many decorations to reflect them, soon enough making George School your home away from home. Think of your room as a time capsule, and by the time you’re a senior, you’ll be able to look around your room when you wake up and see what has become of your time at George School. Pictures of your friends line your desk, the George School varsity “G” hangs on your wall, and so many other memories will be evident that you can’t even imagine yet. So, pack the necessities as the foundation for your George School experience and prepare to create a new sense of home away from home. Best of luck!

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A Comprehensive Guide to GS Food

Michelle Tyson '18

by Michelle Tyson ’18

Let’s be honest: the two biggest priorities of any self-respecting teenager is sleep and food. I know that before coming to George School as a boarder, I spent many a restless night wondering about food at boarding school. Would I be a starved, grey-eyed young Oliver Twist holding up a ceramic bowl, begging for oatmeal gruel? (No.) However–I admit, I was the pickiest eater imaginable. But as I write this, I’m forking Greek-style lamb ragout with sweet potato mac-n-cheese into my mouth. Chock full of ground lamb, cherry tomatoes, sweet potato, feta cheese: all things I abhorred before coming to George School. I can tell you with full confidence that you will leave George School liking twice as many foods as when you came in.

Some tips about the dining hall here: don’t enter with a backpack. Move quickly. Don’t drop plates, (you will garner a loud applause from everyone around you.) Dispense ice before you pour your drink. And most importantly: EAT YOUR VEGETABLES!

George School dining is multifaceted. Meals feature international flavors, and are varied day by day. I suggest eyeing our daily menus for a preview. In addition to meals, you will see on-order omelet stations, fruit smoothie stations, crepe bars, gourmet organic fusions of classic dishes, waffle makers, fresh-squeezed orange juice presses, sushi bars, the panini press, fruit bars, ice cream stations, pizza days, taco days, noodle bowl days, the ever-present dinner stir fry station, et cetera ad infinitum. And, just so you are in the know, every dorm is equipped with a kitchen. Communal cooking is a bonding experience not foreign to boarders.

For even more options, we have Bettye’s and the Bookstore on campus. Bettye’s sells typical cafe/bistro fare, from popcorn chicken and paninis to apple crisp and fresh banana bread. The bookstore, on the other hand, offers grab-and-go snacks and drinks. Throughout campus, there are vending machines available. Across the street from GS (3 minute walk) is a Giant, Rite-Aid, Pizza Hut, and Subway. Further off in Newtown, (15 minute walk) there are many more food options, including a Starbucks where I have spent many hours talking about life with my advisor, Terry Culleton. My recommendations are Osaka, Sandwich Club, Newton’s, and the iconic Zebra-Striped Whale for ice cream.

In short, George School food is not only good, it is ever-improving. Kitchen staff field recommendations from anyone. And if there is a dish you will miss while you’re away from home, tell the chef. I can’t promise it will taste exactly like how your mother made it. But I can promise that GS dining staff will hit the mark pretty darn close.

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A Day in the Life

By Alice Ke ’19

Edited by Connor Stoklosa ’19

My name is Alice Ke and I’m a Junior day student at George School. I live about 10 minutes away from school right outside of Newtown, and this is my day in the life shot through a GoPro strapped to my chest for the day. The day in this video was actually quite a special day on campus, Valentine’s Day! (hence the flowers and pink heart donuts) Every Valentine’s Day, Student Council organizes carnation sales, ones you can buy for friends, faculty, anyone on campus that you’d like to show your platonic, romantic, or even familial love for. I hope you get a sense of the great, positive, and loving energy that’s constantly on campus and among our GS community.

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Culture Shock, Vietnam and Plastic Bottles: Lessons Learned (thus far) at GS

226-William Street

by Will Street ’18

When I was first driving through what I would later call Newtown, my first thought was, “Wow, this place is super white.” Now, I would ask that you excuse me for that, as I come from a city that is quite literally the blackest municipality in the country with an 82% African-American or Black population. I also ask that you remain conscious that I had always been around people who looked differently than me, but an entire city? Never that.

When I hit George School’s campus, though, I released a long, loud sigh of relief when I saw a group of people of color walking across campus, and a smile went across my face when I saw that the group was not monolithic. There was an Asian student, a black student, a white student, and a Hispanic student all laughing and enjoying each other’s company. What I did not know that day is that, that friend group would mirror mine in the coming years. I would make an Asian friend who lives in the bustling city of Seoul, I would make friends who look like me but their origins span from the Bronx to Somalia and I would make white friends from small, rural towns in New Jersey and Pennsylvania. This is proof that George School is not just a melting pot, but it is a massive cauldron of cultures, races, and identities. All that said, there were still growing pains in me reaching this conclusion.

Walking into my room on August 31, 2014 would be the event that would change my perspective on culture and would challenge my patience and my desire to keep an open mind. I stopped in front of the door, and the name read “Truong Son Nguyen Viet” and I felt my face scrunch up and my parents prodded me to open the door. They were seemingly as nervous and unsure as I was. I opened the door and I saw a tall, lanky, large headed (Son, forgive me for that) figure standing and putting away his clothes. He turned around  and there was a brief pause. He broke the silence by saying, “Hi, my name is Son” and held out his hand for me to shake. Admittedly, he was harder to understand, but we’ll address that later.

The first couple of months were bad. We argued about the room being cleaned (I was the dirty one), my volume of showers a day and how loud my friends were when they came inside of the room. A couple of years later, he would later admit that he wanted to make a roommate switch, but luckily he didn’t. After our rough patch, we made a deal that if I taught him to speak English more proficiently, he would teach me Vietnamese curse words. As a freshman, this was a sweet quid pro quo. There were many nights where we would talk and whenever he mispronounced a word, I would kindly tell him the correct pronunciation. In return, he would spend 10 minutes helping me properly pronounce how to tell someone off in his language. We would have extensive conversations, albeit at times uncomfortable, about foreign policy namely the Vietnamese war and how the way we’re taught about it differs. These conversations changed how I viewed the world and encouraged me to be a more understanding, open minded global citizen and he admitted that I changed his perspective on race and how he viewed people of color. We remained roommates up until our senior year, and it was not by choice that we were separated. We were given prefect in different dorms.

Now, at this point you may be wondering what plastic bottles has to do with one of my important lessons. 9th grade, I had been elected to student council as a class representative, and my motives were not pure. In fact, I had this Machiavellian-esque plan to take over the council that ultimately failed, so I would go on to fight every battle that came before us as a council and was debateable. There was one moment that would teach me a lesson that would be important to my development as a GS man. One day, a proposal came before us to discuss the use of plastic water bottles. I thought to myself: “this is my chance!” I tirelessly researched plastic bottle usage and how it would hurt the American worker. I said my points before the meeting, and people looked at me confused and some were chuckling. Later that year, Tom Hoopes would give me the wisdom I needed all along and that was to pick your battles carefully. That made me realize that every hill is not worth dying on and there are more noble and pure causes to have discourse over. This skill is going to help me in my life as a public servant and global citizen and it will always remind me to make sure my motivations are pure and that something is a fight worth fighting.

There it is. I tied together Culture Shock, Vietnam and Plastic Bottles. I reckon Kim McGlyn is to be given credit for that!

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One Day at George School

by Connor Stoklosa ’19

My name is Connor Stoklosa and I am a Junior day student at George school. I live roughly twenty minutes away, on the other side of Newtown. This video is what a day of my George School life looks like through my eyes. Join me on my adventure and gain a greater understanding of our community.

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