Monday in Holguín

home for the mentally challenged (2)

 

by Owen Buxton ’20

Today we went to a home for the mentally challenged. I initially thought that it was a home solely for children, but I soon learned that the age of the average patient was 45. We didn’t really do much at the home, which was actually pretty disappointing. I was really looking forward to playing with some kids. Instead, we took a quasi-tour of the facility and stood around a whole bunch. One highlight was a 3 year old named Cesár. Cesár has Down’s Syndrome and is too freaking adorable. We watched him toddle around and throw his shoes. We also watched a girl with Down’s sing and dance, which was really cute. We then returned to the church and I chilled out on the roof for a bit and took a short siesta. Later in the day, Cesár and a few of the other patients came to the church and we played with them. I had brought a few bags full of LEGOs with me from home, so I took those out and everyone loved them. I showed them Batman, Superman, and all the things they could make with the plastic bricks. Because food is to tight in Cuba right now, the church we’re staying at can’t feed us. Instead, we were divided into small groups and distributed among families in the community. Jayde, Joseph, and I were sent to Fernando’s house for dinner. I was apprehensive at first, but I think we all ended up having a wonderful time. We discussed a variety of topics during dinner (which was muy delicioso), including chicken fighting, Volkswagens, internet access, and the Spanish-American War. Fernando’s wife prepared us some bomb pizza and spaghetti, and for dessert we had bread pudding which was freaking fantastic. The night was filled with laughs, a lot of Spanish, and good food. Tonight’s dinner was a highlight of the trip.

P.S. – Mom, send me pictures from Disney so I can see them when I get to Miami. Also, buy Cheerios for the house I miss them so badly.

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Filed under A Day in the Life, Service, Student Work, Students

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